Reading Japan Cool

Manga today is seen as so thoroughly Japanese that it would seem reckless to suggest otherwise.The construction ofJapan C001 is founded on perceptions that its contents and practices are unique to Japan.Yet the notion of reading manga ...

Reading Japan Cool

Japanese animation, video games, and manga have attracted fans around the world. The characters, the stories, and the sensibilities that come out of these cultural products are together called Japan Cool. This is not a sudden fad, but is rooted in manga—Japanese comics—which since the mid-1940s have developed in an exponential way. In spite of a gradual decline in readership, manga still commands over a third of the publishing output. The volume of manga works that is being produced and has been through history is enormous. There are manga publications that attract readers of all ages and genders. The diversity in content attracts readers well into adulthood. Surveys on reading practices have found that almost all Japanese people read manga or have done so at some point in their lives. The skills of reading manga are learned by readers themselves, but learned in the context of other readers and in tandem with school learning. Manga reading practices are sustained by the practices of other readers, and manga content therefore serves as a topic of conversation for both families and friends. Moreover, manga is one of the largest sources of content for media production in film, television, and video games. Manga literacy, the practices of the readers, the diversity of titles, and the sheer number of works provide the basis for the movement recognized as Japan Cool. Reading Japan Cool is directed at an audience of students of Japanese studies, discourse analysts, educators, parents, and manga readers.

More Books:

Reading Japan Cool
Language: en
Pages: 244
Authors: John E. Ingulsrud, Kate Allen
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2010-02-03 - Publisher: Lexington Books

Japanese animation, video games, and manga have attracted fans around the world. The characters, the stories, and the sensibilities that come out of these cultural products are together called Japan Cool. This is not a sudden fad, but is rooted in manga—Japanese comics—which since the mid-1940s have developed in an
Reading Japan Cool
Language: en
Pages: 230
Authors: John E. Ingulsrud, Kate Allen
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2010-02 - Publisher:

The characters, the stories, and the sensibilities coming out of Japanese animation, manga, and video games are together called Japan Cool. The origins of the movement are in manga, the practices of the readers, the diversity of the titles, and the sheer number of works.
Manga and the Representation of Japanese History
Language: en
Pages: 273
Authors: Roman Rosenbaum
Categories: Art
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013 - Publisher: Routledge

"This edited collection explores how graphic art and in particular Japanese manga represent Japanese history. The articles explore the representation of history in manga from disciplines that include such diverse fields as literary studies, politics, history, cultural studies, linguistics, narratology, and semiotics. Despite this diversity of approaches all academics from
The Norwegian-American Lutheran Experience in 1950s Japan
Language: en
Pages: 332
Authors: Kate Allen, John E. Ingulsrud
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2015-12-15 - Publisher: Lexington Books

Stepping Up to the Cold War Challenge: The Norwegian-American Lutheran Experience in 1950s Japan describes the events that led to the Evangelical Lutheran Church (ELC), an American Christian denomination, to respond to General MacArthur’s call for missionaries. This Church did not initially respond, but did so in 1949 only after
Fluid Orality in the Discourse of Japanese Popular Culture
Language: en
Pages: 344
Authors: Senko K. Maynard
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-03-31 - Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing Company

This volume invites the reader into the world of pragmatic and discourse studies in Japanese popular culture. Through “character-speak”, the book analyzes quoted speech in light (graphic) novels, the effeminate onee kotoba in talk shows, narrative character in keetai (mobile phone) novels, floating whispers in manga, and fictionalized dialects in