The Postcolonial Intellectual

For some critics, the apparent aloofness or arrogance of the postcolonial intellectual as exemplified by Bhabha is deeply offensive. Aijaz Ahmad most famously has taken a strident stance against those who appear to have benefited from ...

The Postcolonial Intellectual

Addressing a neglected dimension in postcolonial scholarship, Oliver Lovesey examines the figure of the postcolonial intellectual as repeatedly evoked by the fabled troika of Said, Spivak, and Bhabha and by members of the pan-African diaspora such as Cabral, Fanon, and James. Lovesey’s primary focus is Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o, one of the greatest writers of post-independence Africa. Ngũgĩ continues to be a vibrant cultural agitator and innovator who, in contrast to many other public intellectuals, has participated directly in grassroots cultural renewal, enduring imprisonment and exile as a consequence of his engagement in political action. Lovesey’s comprehensive study concentrates on Ngũgĩ’s non-fictional prose writings, including his largely overlooked early journalism and his most recent autobiographical and theoretical work. He offers a postcolonial critique that acknowledges Ngũgĩ’s complex position as a virtual spokesperson for the oppressed and global conscience who now speaks from a location of privilege. Ngũgĩ’s writings, Lovesey shows, display a seemingly paradoxical consistency in their concerns over nearly five decades at the same time that there have been enormous transformations in his ideology and a shift in his focus from Africa’s holocaust to Africa’s renaissance. Lovesey argues that Ngũgĩ’s view of the intellectual has shifted from an alienated, nearly neocolonial stance to a position that allows him to celebrate intellectual activism and a return to the model of the oral vernacular intellectual even as he challenges other global intellectuals. Tracing the development of this notion of the postcolonial intellectual, Lovesey argues for Ngũgĩ’s rightful position as a major postcolonial theorist who helped establish postcolonial studies.

More Books:

The Postcolonial Intellectual
Language: en
Pages: 248
Authors: Oliver Lovesey
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-03-03 - Publisher: Routledge

Addressing a neglected dimension in postcolonial scholarship, Oliver Lovesey examines the figure of the postcolonial intellectual as repeatedly evoked by the fabled troika of Said, Spivak, and Bhabha and by members of the pan-African diaspora such as Cabral, Fanon, and James. Lovesey’s primary focus is Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o, one of
Postcolonial Intellectuals in Europe
Language: en
Pages: 256
Authors: Sandra Ponzanesi, Adriano José Habed
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-08-31 - Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

Offers overview of postcolonial intellectuals in Europe from the first half of the nineteenth century to present day.
The Postcolonial Aura
Language: en
Pages: 272
Authors: Arif Dirlik
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-02-20 - Publisher: Routledge

The essays in this volume range from questions of cultural self-representation in China to more general problems of reconceptualizing global relationships in response to contemporary changes. Although the new era of global capitalism calls for the remapping of global relations, such remapping must be informed both by a grasp of
The Postcolonial Gramsci
Language: en
Pages: 253
Authors: Neelam Francesca Rashmi Srivastava, Baidik Bhattacharya
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2012 - Publisher: Routledge

The importance of Antonio Gramsci's work for postcolonial studies can hardly be exaggerated, and in this volume, contributors situate Gramsci's work in the vast and complex oeuvre of postcolonial studies. Specifically, this book endeavors to reassess the impact on postcolonial studies of the central role assigned by Gramsci to culture
Postcolonial Theory
Language: en
Pages: 216
Authors: Leela Gandhi
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-07-28 - Publisher: Routledge

Postcolonial Theory is a ground-breaking critical introduction to the burgeoning field of postcolonial studies. Leela Gandhi is the first to clearly map out this field in terms of its wider philosophical and intellectual context, drawing important connections between postcolonial theory and poststructuralism, postmodernism, marxism and feminism. She assesses the contribution