The Rhetoric of Empire

This ambitious book is an answer of sorts. By exposing the rhetoric of empire, Spurr begins to loosen its hold over discourse about—and between—different cultures.

The Rhetoric of Empire

The white man's burden, darkest Africa, the seduction of the primitive: such phrases were widespread in the language Western empires used to talk about their colonial enterprises. How this language itself served imperial purposes--and how it survives today in writing about the Third World--are the subject of David Spurr's book, a revealing account of the rhetorical strategies that have defined Western thinking about the non-Western world. Despite historical differences among British, French, and American versions of colonialism, their rhetoric had much in common. The Rhetoric of Empire identifies these shared features—images, figures of speech, and characteristic lines of argument—and explores them in a wide variety of sources. A former correspondent for the United Press International, the author is equally at home with journalism or critical theory, travel writing or official documents, and his discussion is remarkably comprehensive. Ranging from T. E. Lawrence and Isak Dineson to Hemingway and Naipaul, from Time and the New Yorker to the National Geographic and Le Monde, from journalists such as Didion and Sontag to colonial administrators such as Frederick Lugard and Albert Sarraut, this analysis suggests the degree to which certain rhetorical tactics penetrate the popular as well as official colonial and postcolonial discourse. Finally, Spurr considers the question: Can the language itself—and with it, Western forms of interpretation--be freed of the exercise of colonial power? This ambitious book is an answer of sorts. By exposing the rhetoric of empire, Spurr begins to loosen its hold over discourse about—and between—different cultures.

More Books:

The Rhetoric of Empire
Language: en
Pages: 212
Authors: David Spurr
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines
Type: BOOK - Published: 1993 - Publisher: Duke University Press

The white man's burden, darkest Africa, the seduction of the primitive: such phrases were widespread in the language Western empires used to talk about their colonial enterprises. How this language itself served imperial purposes--and how it survives today in writing about the Third World--are the subject of David Spurr's book,
Christianity and the Rhetoric of Empire
Language: en
Pages: 261
Authors: Averil Cameron
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 1994-12-02 - Publisher: Univ of California Press

Many reasons can be given for the rise of Christianity in late antiquity and its flourishing in the medieval world. In asking how Christianity succeeded in becoming the dominant ideology in the unpromising circumstances of the Roman Empire, Averil Cameron turns to the development of Christian discourse over the first
Tradition and the Rhetoric of Right
Language: en
Pages: 339
Authors: David J. Lorenzo
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines
Type: BOOK - Published: 1999 - Publisher: Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press

"This book examines and establishes the importance of one aspect of popular political arguments - rhetorical features that draw upon tradition as taken-for-granted values, judgments, and calculations. It illustrates how popular political arguments draw upon this "rhetoric of right," unique to each political community, to establish the "correctness" or "rightness"
Acts of the Apostles and the Rhetoric of Roman Imperialism
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Drew W. Billings
Categories: Religion
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017-07-25 - Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Acts of the Apostles is normally understood as a historical report of events of the early church and serves as the organizing centerpiece of the New Testament canon. In this book, Drew W. Billings demonstrates that Acts was written in conformity with broader representational trends and standards found on imperial
Modern Drama and the Rhetoric of Theater
Language: en
Pages: 230
Authors: William B. Worthen
Categories: Performing Arts
Type: BOOK - Published: 1992-01-01 - Publisher: Univ of California Press

The history of drama is typically viewed as a series of inert "styles." Tracing British and American stage drama from the 1880s onward, W. B. Worthen instead sees drama as the interplay of text, stage production, and audience. How are audiences manipulated? What makes drama meaningful? Worthen identifies three rhetorical